Jonathan Tracy1,2,3,4

(29 April 1742 - between 4 May 1803 and 12 February 1806)

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Relationship5th great-grandfather of The 3 Tracys
Family Group:Tracy
Trees14 Generations of Our Ancestors
Our Tracy Family Pedigree
Our Descent From Lt. Thomas Tracy of Norwich Connecticut
FatherChristopher Tracy5 (1 Jun 1711 - 3 Mar 1765)
MotherElizabeth Tyler6,5 (4 Nov 1714 - 11 Sep 1757)

Birth - Marriage - Death

ChildJonathan Tracy was born on 29 April 1742, in Preston, New London Co., Connecticut Colony, New England.7,5,6,2
ChildHe was baptized on 2 September 1744, in the First Congregational Church, Preston, New London Co., Connecticut Colony, New England.8
GroomHe married Mary Flack circa 1766.
     A 1787 deed of sale mentions Jonathan Tracy and "his wife Mary." There is uncertainty about Mary's surname, "Flack". No Flack family has been found in any of the areas where Jonathan is known to have been living around 1766.
     Jonathan and Mary probably married in New Jersey or New York... or possibly, but not likely, in Connecticut or Pennsylvania.9,10
DeceasedHe died between 4 May 1803 and 12 February 1806 in New York.
     On 4 May 1803, Jonathan appeared in person before Judge John Knox of Steuben County and acknowledged his signature on a deed transferring property to his son Solomon. On 12 February 1806, Jonathan Jr. appeared before James Faulkner, the First Judge of Steuben Co., as one of the witnesses to the deed covering the sale of a portion of Jonathan Sr.'s property in December of 1795, to swear to the authenticity of his father's signature so the deed could be recorded. If Jonathan Sr. had been living at this date he would most likely have been able to make those assurances in person as he did in 1803... unless he had moved elsewhere... and there is no evidence that he had moved. (The deed itself was finally recorded in December of 1820... probably when the property once again changed hands.)11

Children with Mary Flack:

  • Christopher Tracy+ (c. 1767 - ); Probably New York or New Jersey. - But this Connection Is Based On Pure Speculation
  • Henry Tracy+ (5 Jul 1769 - 10 Jul 1846); Research has been done on the direct line male descendants of Lt. Thomas Tracy through the sixth generation - i.e. the generation that would include the family of this Jonathan Tracy. As of February 2016 no records have been found giving definitive evidence for any children of Jonathan and his wife Mary. However real estate transfers in Steuben Co., New York, in the early 1800s that almost certainly involve this Jonathan make a reference to a Jonathan Jr., and there are other Tracy men, some siblings, named in the same immediate vicinity and context leading to the assumption that all of them are at least related.
         Knowing that this Henry Tracy was born in 1769 places him in sixth generation after Lt. Thomas Tracy. An accounting for each son's sons down through those generations after Thomas leaves only the Jonathan born in 1742 as the likely candidate to be the father of this Henry, born 1769. Recent DNA test results appear to confirm that a direct line back to Lt. Thomas Tracy is all but certain for Henry. Since Jonathan's ancestry has been well documented back to Lt. Thomas, and based on "the preponderance of the evidence" pointing to the parental connection between that Henry and this Jonathan, we can be reasonably assume this lineage is correct.
         One researcher of this Henry's ancestral line makes the connection to Lt. Thomas Tracy by having him, Henry Tracy6, as the son of an un-named daughter of the Flack family and Jonathan Tracy5, son of Christopher4, son of Christopher3, son of Jonathan2, son of Lt. Thomas Tracy1. The well documented ancestral line from Jonathan, b. 1742, to Lt. Thomas is used as the basis of this Tracy Family History/Genealogy.
         This Family History/Genalogy places this Henry Tracy here as it is the most reasonable conclusion that has been found for his parentage. BUT, this is still an assumption... based on considerable research32,33,34
  • Jonathan Tracy Jr.+ (7 Nov 1772 - 18 Dec 1855)
  • Isaac Tracy+ (25 May 1775 - 1850)
  • Solomon Tracy (1778 - )
  • Louisa (Lois) Tracy+ (c. 1780 - 17 Dec 1857)

Some Life Events of Interest

23 September 1786, in Minisink, Goshen Precinct, Orange Co., Province of New York, British Middle Colonies, Jonathan witnessed the will of Johannis Dacker (Decker), an early settler in the Minisink region of New York/New Jersey. The other witnesses were Jacobus (James) Van Fliet (or van Vliet) and John English.
     Johannis (Johannes or John), his son Levi, who is named as an heir in the will, and Wilhellimus (William) Cole, the executor of his estate, along with the witness Jacobus Van Fliet had pledged their loyalty to the Continental cause in the conflict with Great Britain by signing the Pledge of 1775 in Minisink. Neither Jonathan Tracy nor John English, appear on that list of signers from Orange Co., Province of New York. Though their names do not appear on that list, it is known that John English served as a Lieutenant in the Orange Co. Militia during the Revolution and in 1782 Jonathan was enlisted to serve for the County's militia.
     Decker, Cole and van Vliet were all prominent in the affairs of the Dutch Reformed Church of Mackhhackeneck, the oldest church in Minisink, located about 1/2 mile south of Port Jervis. Neither John English nor Jonathan Tracy appear on any lists of the church's members.
     None of the parties named in the will are shown on the tax roll as neighbors of Jonathan in Minisink in 1775. However, in 1786, a Johanis Decker and a Wilhelmus Cole are inluded among the names of the men on the roll for the Orange Co. Militia (Land Bounty Rights) Third Regiment, as is Jonathan. Other than perhaps friendship among these three men, there is no obvious reason for Jonathan to have been called to witness the will of one of the more prominent members of a Minisink Valley founding family.
     The will was proved 4 July 1793.12,13,14

Founder or First Settler

On 18 June 1762, Jonathan and his father, Christopher Tracy, were among the first settlers of Cushetunk, Delaware River Valley, Westmoreland Co., Connecticut Colony, New England.
     The cousins Isaac and Christopher, and Christopher´s son, Jonathan, are also associated with The Ten Mile River Settlement a bit further up the river. That settlement was broken up by Indians in 1763 and all of the inhabitants were massacred. Christopher, Jonathan and Isaac all lived active lives beyond the 1763 date of the Indian Massacre so either they were never part of that settlement, were no longer part of that settlement... or they had the good fortune to have been elsewhere when the Indians wiped it out.
     (You can read about the Tracys move from Connecticut to the Delaware River Valley here.)15,16
Between 1790 and 1791, Jonathan Tracy and James Martin were among the founders/first settlers of Tuscarora/Middletown, Ontario Co., New York.
     Along with Jonathan and James were James' brothers John and Isaac Martin, and four or five others.17,18

Military

Military ServiceIn 1782, while living Minisink, Goshen Precinct, Orange Co., Province of New York, British Middle Colonies, Jonathan Tracy was carried on the roll of Minisink's Third Regiment of the Orange County Militia.
     There is no record of Jonathan having been called up for actual service during the Revolutionary War, but his willingness to be called up entitled him to a share in bounty land allocated for the Third Regiment. But while his name appears among those eligible for Land Bounty Rights due to their voluntary enlistment no record of his having exercised that right has been found; but it is possible that he may have sold his rights - something many of those who were eligible did giving them funds with which they could purchase land they might prefer rather than that set aside as Bounty Land.19

Community Service

From 1797 to 1799, in Middletown, Steuben Co., New York, Jonathan Tracy was elected to official duties.
     At the first town meeting for the newly renamed town of Middletown, in the newly formed county of Steuben, Jonathan was elected a Poormaster and as a Commissioner of Schools. (The first school-house in the county was built in Middletown at about this time, maybe as early as 1796.)
     Jonathan was re-elected an overseer of the poor again the following year 1798, when he was also elected as one of the assessors for that year and an assessor once again in 1799.18,20

Land and Property

Property AcquisitionOn 3 September 1772, Jonathan Tracy bought a piece of property in Sussex Co., Province of East New Jersey, English Middle Colonies. The land, 57 +/- acres, was "lying near the West Branch of the Wallkill called then Mudkill...," (near present day village of Unionville, Minisink Twp., Orange Co., NY) and purchased from Bryan Hammel, of Wantage, and Blandinah his wife for the sum of Ninety six pound, Twelve Shillings proclamation Money of New Jersey. This tract of land was neighboring other land of Hammel's Tract and land of Abraham Fanakin (Sanakin?). The deed was witnessed by James and Helene Clark and Isaac Up the Grove but was not recorded until 21 December 1787, when Jonathan and his wife Mary sold the property to the Clarks, who may have been neighbors as they had been involved with both exchanges. It is interesting to note that Jonathan's wife, Mary, is named in the sale but is not mentioned in the purchase.21
Property OwnedIn September 1775, Jonathan Tracy owned a piece of property in Assessment District No. 6, Minisink, Goshen Precinct, Orange Co., Province of New York, British Middle Colonies. He is listed by the Assessor as having property with an estimated value of 1 pound, 9 shillings, 7 pence. Residents had actually begun moving into the area about 50 years earlier but this assessment-roll of 1775 is the earliest listing of all the residents of the settlement. The population had grown very slowly, in part due to the long unresolved dispute between New York and New Jersey over the location of the border between the two provinces.
     Jonathan is listed just before one James Clark, presumably his neighbor... and the name of one of the wittnesses to the purchase deed for the property dated in 1772 (and the name of the person to which Jonathan sold the property in 1787) in Sussex Co., New Jersey - later Orange Co., New York, after the boundry dispute mentioned above was settled. (1773.)22
Property TransferHe and Mary Tracy sold their property in Wantage, Orange Co., New York, on 17 March 1787. This was the 57 +/- acres which was, "lying near the West Branch of the Wallkill called then Mudkill...," that Jonathan had purchased from Bryan Hammel, of Wantage, and Blandinah his wife in 1772, for the sum of Ninety six pound, Twelve Shillings proclamation Money of New Jersey. He was now selling it to James and Helene Clark, witnesses to the original purchase deed, for "One Hundred and Sixty pounds York money...." , (Presumably at a profit? He did withold one half of the mineral rights in the deed of sale.) The land when purchased was located in Sussex Co., in the Eastern district of the Province of New Jersey... but when sold was in Orange Co., the State of New York. The dispute over the boundary line between the provinces had been settled in 1773... moving New York's border south of Wantage. (And the outcome of the Revolutionary War changed the country - and the type of money used.) The deed was "Signed, Sealed and Delivered" by both Jonathan and his wife Mary (the first and so far the only place where the name of his wife is given). It was witnessed by Samuel Vanfleet and Ebenezer W. Mead and recorded on 21 December 1787.23
Property AcquisitionHe acquired a piece of property on 1 January 1793, in Tuscarora/Middletown, Ontario Co., New York. He bought "about five hundred and thirty Acres be it more or less," from Daniel Ross of Tioga County. This was a parcel of land running a half mile along the south bank of the Canisteo River and "lying in the Township number two in the third range and County of Ontario & State of New York," for which the price was "fifty-nine pounds seven shillings New York Currency." For payment Ross accepted two notes (bearing the same date as the deed) from Jonathan who was to pay them by 1 May 1794; the deed would be voided if he was unable to do so. The signatures were witnessed by Samuel B. Rice and Israel Cattin (County JP).
The deed (and the mortgage) was recorded in Steuben County on 3 June 1803.24
Property TransferOn 1 December 1795,Jonathan Tracy transferred the title to a portion of his property in Tuscarora/Middletown, Ontario Co., New York. He deeded to his son IsaacTracy 140 acres for the token price of 10 pounds New York Currency. His signature was witnessed by his son Jonathan, Jr., and Ebenezer Goodhue.25
Property TransferHe sold a portion of his property in Tuscarora/Middletown, Ontario Co., New York,to Asa Comstock on 1 December 1795. This portion was 140 acres of the tract of 530 acres Jonathan, Sr., had purchased in 1793. He sold it for, "Sixty Seven pounds eight Shillings New York currency," which meant that in two years he was able to recover more than the cost of the entire original purchase. His signature on the deed was witnessed by Ebenezer Goodhue (who was related to his daughter Louisa -Lois- who had married a Goodhue) and his son Jonathan, Jr.26
Property TransferOn 1 December 1795,Jonathan Tracy and Solomon Tracy transferred the title to a portion of their property in Tuscarora/Middletown, Ontario Co., New York. Jonathan deeded 140 acres to his son Solomon Tracy for the token price of 5 pounds New York Currency... "Reserving the use and Benefit of the above granted Premises untill the Discease of his Mother." Jonathan's signature was witnessed by Ebenezer Goodhue and his son Jonathan, Jr. This parcel, located between that of Solomon's brother, Isaac Tracy, and that of Asa Comstock, was no doubt the location of Jonathan's and Mary Tracy's family home.27

Residences and Censuses

Jonathan Tracy appeared on the 1790 Federal Census of Chemung Town, Montgomery Co., New York, with a household consisting of three males over 16 (himself and probably Henry and Jonathan), two under 16, (probably sons Isaac and Solomon) and three females (Mary and probably two daughters, Louisa). Living nearby (three families were listed between theirs) was a Christopher Tracy with a household consisting of one male sixteen years and older, and two females. Their relationship to Jonathan is yet to be determined but it is possible that Christopher is Jonathan's eldest son.
     These Tracys enumerated in Chemung Town in 1790 were very likely living in the area of Montgomery County which 10 years later had been incorporated within the town of Union. Union was itself later broken into towns that included Tioga, Chenango, Owego, Lisle and Vestal... towns in Tioga and Broome Counties, towns and counties associated with Tracys. A Christopher Tracy, who is most likely the son of Jonathan Tracy b.1742, is listed among the inhabitants of Union, Tioga Co., in the 1800 Census.28
Jonathan Tracy (Sr.) does not appear on the 1800 Federal Census of Middletown, Steuben Co., New York. The return shows: Free White Males = 1 >10yrs, 1 btwn 16 & 26yrs, 1 btwn 26 & 45yrs; Free White Females = 1 btwn 10 and 16yrs, 1 over 45yrs;
     This enumeration for the family of A Jonathan Tracy has no entry in the Free White Males over 45yrs category (Jonathan was 58 yrs old in 1800 and is known to have been alive in 1803) so unless the enumerator made an error this census entry is unlikely to be for "our" Jonathan Sr.... Nor, aside from the Free White Female (FWF) over 45, who could represent Jonathan Sr.'s spouse Mary, are any of the ages consistent with the rest of his family.
     The ages in Jonathan Jr.'s family are not at all consistent with the entries on this census either... since the oldest FWM entry is in the 26yrs to 45yrs category and since, being 29 yrs old, Jonathan Jr. was in that age grouping it could be suggested that this might be the enumeration for Jonathan Jr.'s household.
     But... the younger FWF is at most 16 years old and, and while not impossible, it is unlikely that this would be the wife - fourteen years younger - of the head of the household, if that head is Jonathan, Jr.. On the other hand, if it represents a daughter, the head of the household would have been only between 13 years and 19 years old when she was born, again unlikely though not impossible.
     And the FWF over 45yrs is much more likely to be the mother of someone rather than the wife head of the household... unless she was the head of the household... but the head of the household is named Jonathan... ???29

Will

Jonathan Tracy was named an heir in the setlement of his maternal grandfather's estate. Hopestill Tyler'swill, dated 26 February 1754 in Preston, New London Co., Connecticut Colony, New England, named Jonathan's mother, Elizabeth (Tyler) Tracy: "Item, I give to my Dutiful Daughter Elizabeth Tracy the one half of the remaining part of my movable Estate the above Legaseys Being First Paid" (original spelling retained).
     Hope lived until 7 October 1762; Elizabeth predeceased her father, having died in 1757, and her share of his estate was subsequently divided among her children.
     The after death inventory of Hope's estate was made 26 Oct 1762, but the will was not recorded until 5 Jan 1764 and the date the distribution of the estate was recorded was 1 May 1764.
     By the Spring of 1764 Jonathan was living, or at least had family interests, on the frontier in the Delaware River Valley. He surely could have used the items his Uncle Caleb (Elizabeth's brother and executor of Hope Tyler's will) "set off" for him at the Distribution of his grandfather's estate, especially the first few items: "One Gun & Sword; One Pound of Powder & Four Pounds of Lead; One Corn Broome / One Tin Dipper; One Half Barrel / & One Butter Tub; Three Broken Chains & Sundry Pieces; One Pair of Sheep Sheers & One Ax; with a total value of £2 s15 d10."30,31
He was listed as a beneficiary in Anna Tyler's will on 9 September 1766 in Preston, New London Co., Connecticut Colony, New England.30

Sources - Citations

  1. [S148] New York (State). Comptroller's Office, New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, vol. I vols. (Albany, New York: J. B. Lyon Co., 1904). Copy in digital library.
  2. [S149] Mike Cattin - Compiler, online at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=AHN&db=mdcattin&id=I2231 (RootsWeb's World Connect Project GEDCOMs), downloaded 23 Jan 2006.
  3. [S150] Lorraine Cook, Compiler, The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994-2002), Connecticut Town Birth Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection).
  4. [S150] Lorraine Cook, Barbour Collection.
  5. [S151] Matilda Ormand Abbey - Compiler, Genealogy of the Family of Lt. Thomas Tracy of Norwich, Connecticut (Milwaukee: D.S. Harkness & Company, Printers, 1888). Local File Reference: TRA-BPC-119, pg. 50.
  6. [S373] Willard I. Tyler Brigham, The Tyler Genealogy - The Descendants of Job Tyler, of Andover, Massachusetts, 1619 - 1700 (Plainfield, N.J. & Tylerville, Conn.: Cornelius B. Tyler & Rollin Tyler, 1912), pg. 97.
  7. [S416] Barbour Collection of Connecticut Vital Records - Statewide Slip Index (Hartford, Connecticut: Connecticut State Library, unknown publish date). Citing Preston, Connecticut Records; Birth - Marriage - Death;, birth date: 29 APR 1742 birth place: Preston, New London Co., Connecticut Colony, New England.
  8. [S427] The Bi-Centennial Celebration: First Congregational Church of Preston, Connecticut, 1698-1898; Together with Statistics of the Church Taken from the Church Records
    (n.p.: Biblio Bazaar, LLC, 1900).
  9. [S439] Orange County - Deeds Book C-D: mentions Jonathan Tracy and "his wife Mary.", Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy, Tracy Home Office.
  10. [S426] Mike Cattin - Compiler, "The Cattin Family - Jonathan - 1742", 2 February 2001 (Prepared 28 Oct 2000) (RootsWeb's World Connect Project). GEDCOM; e-mail address
    Local File Reference: TRA-GEN-169
    Apparently Mike's sources for ancestry of Johanthan back through Jonathan's father, Christopher, to Lt. Thomas Tracy are: Abbey's Tracy Genealogy, IGI, and the Ancestral File... both of these last are from the LDS. Care should be taken regarding information about the family of Jonathan Tracy (1742) is full of inaccuaracies... The data before and after that particular family seems to be okay., first appearance of the name FLACK.
  11. [S440] Steuben County - Deeds vols. 1-3: Liber 10, pg. 401 Jonathan Jr. appeared before Judge of Steuben Co., Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy, Tracy Home Office.
  12. [S430] Abstracts of Wills, Administrations and Guardianships in NY State, 1787 - 1835, online at: Photocopy in SCT Digital Files; Original manuscript in: Eardeley Genealogy Collection: New York State Abstracts of Wills, Brooklyn Historical Society.
  13. [S148] New York (State). Comptroller's Office, New York in the Revolution, ppg. 255,256.
  14. [S410] E.M. Ruttenber and L.H. Clark - compilers, History of Orange County, New York, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men (Goshen, New York: Everts & Peck, 1881), pg. 660 Tax Roll.
  15. [S339] Sullivan County Historian James W. Burbank, Cushetunk,The first White Settlement in the Upper Delaware River Valley (Callicoon, N.Y.: Sullivan County Democrat, January and February 1952). Photo Copy on File.
  16. [S340] M.S. Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, Containing A Copious Selection of the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anectdotes, Etc. Etc. (Easton, Pennsylvania: Bixler & Corwin, 1860). PDF Copy of this book is in SCT's digital library, assessment list prepared in 1762 by John Williamson at direction of John Jennings, Sheriff of Northampton Co., PA.
  17. [S420] Guy H. McMaster, History of the Settlement of Steuben County, N.Y. (Bath, N.Y.: R.S. Underhill & Co., 1853), pg. 78.
  18. [S145] W. W. Clayton, History of Steuben County, New York, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers (Philadelphia: Lewis Peck & Co., 1879). Local File Reference: HT7-BPC-94; SCT digital library includes a PDF copy of the 1879 edition, digitized by the Internet Archive < http://www.archive.org
  19. [S148] New York (State). Comptroller's Office, New York in the Revolution, pg. 256: listed next to his 2nd cousin Savan (shown as Lavan) Tracy.
  20. [S125] Millard Fillmore Roberts - compiler and editor, Historical Gazetteer of Steuben County, New York (Syracuse, N.Y.: Roberts, Millard Fillmore, 1891). Local File Reference: HT7-BPC-93, ppg. 94 - 96.
  21. [S439] Orange County Deeds Book C-D: vol. D, years 1764-1790, pp. 339, 340; Deed Recorded 21 December 1787, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  22. [S410] E.M. Ruttenber and L.H. Clark - compilers, History of Orange County, NY, pg.660; 1775 Assessment Roll; Minisink.
  23. [S439] Orange County Deeds Book C-D: vol. D, years 1764-1790, pg. 338; Deed Recorded 21 December 1787, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  24. [S440] Steuben County Deeds vols. 1-3: Liber 3, pg. 8, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  25. [S440] Steuben County Deeds vols. 1-3: Liber 8, pp. 641/682, 642/683, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  26. [S440] Steuben County Deeds vols. 1-3: Liber 10, pp. 400, 401, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  27. [S440] Steuben County Deeds vols. 1-3: Liber 3, pp. 9, 10, 11, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy.
  28. [S334] Jonathan Tracy household, 1790 U.S. Census, Montgomery Co., New York, Chemung, page 80, line no. 20; Washington: National Archives. Originally viewed and transcribed by SCT, 16 Oct 1998, at National Archives, Washington D.C., Series M637, Roll#6.
  29. [S433] Jonathan Tracy household, 1800 U.S. Census, Steuben Co., New York, Middletown, page 200-201 (bottom of page), line 2; Washington: National Archives. Originally viewed 16 Oct 1998, at National Archives, Washington D.C., Series M32, Roll#24; Entries at top of filmed page are for Lindley, Steuben Co., NY, this census must be for Jonathan, Jr., b 1771, as if it was for his father there would have been an entry in the category for Free White Males 45 and over.
  30. [S341] Hopestill Tyler will (before 17 Oct 1762), Probate records of Norwich, Connecticut, Vols. 1-3 v.3,, Paper Files of Sean C Tracy, Tracy Home Office.
  31. [S703] Hopestill Tyler will (5 January 1764), Will Administration Papers - Distribution, Digital Files of Sean C. Tracy, Tracy Home Office.
  32. [S278] Frances Manwaring Caulkins, History of Norwich Connecticut: From its possession by the Indians to the year 1866 (Hartford: The Author, 1866).
  33. [S151] Matilda Ormand Abbey - Compiler, Genealogy of Family of Lt. Thomas Tracy.
  34. [S426] Mike Cattin - Compiler, "The Cattin Family - Jonathan - 1742", GEDCOM; e-mail address
    Local File Reference: TRA-GEN-169
    Apparently Mike's sources for ancestry of Johanthan back through Jonathan's father, Christopher, to Lt. Thomas Tracy are: Abbey's Tracy Genealogy, IGI, and the Ancestral File... both of these last are from the LDS. Care should be taken regarding information about the family of Jonathan Tracy (1742) is full of inaccuaracies... The data before and after that particular family seems to be okay.
Last Edited20 May 2018

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